Twelve days of food gifts: vanilla sugar

twelve days of food gifts 2012: apple cider caramels | basil vodka | lemon sugar | lime sugar | Old Bay vodka | orange sugar | peppercorn vodka | rosemary salt | salted maple caramels | vanilla extract | vanilla sugar | zesty salt’n'pep

Okay, this is the last infused sugar, I swear.

For those of you just joining, this is my Twelve Days of Food Gifts series. I post recipes and printables, you use them to make gifts. Simple as that. This is day nine. Almost there. Mother of god.

Anyway, this is the easiest infused sugar, because the vanilla beans don’t need to be peeled and they don’t make the sugar all weird and clumpy. Also, if you find that the sugar is not vanilla-y enough and you need to wrap it up and get it under the tree, just put a vanilla bean piece or two inside the bottle with the sugar and pretend you meant to do it that way the whole time. I won’t tell if you don’t tell, because that’s what I did.

What would I use vanilla infused sugar for? Well, what doesn’t taste good with a hint of vanilla? Exactly.

vanilla sugar

Vanilla Sugar

Makes 4 jars

heaping 1 2/3 cup sugar
4-8 vanilla beans (scraped is fine)

Slice vanilla beans in half lengthwise. If desired, scrape out caviar to use in another recipe. Put beans, scraped or not, in a glass jar. Cover with sugar. Shake shake shake.

Let sit in a cool, dark spot for 1 to 2 weeks, until fragrant. Shake at least twice a day.

Remove vanilla beans. Then pack scented sugar into spice jars, adding a vanilla bean (or half of a vanilla bean) to the bottle if desired.

For Gifting:
J.K. Adams 2 ounce Flint Jars
full-sheet inkjet adhesive
printable (single 5.25″x2.75″ label)
printable (3 5.25″x2.75″ labels per 8.5″x11″ adhesive sheet)
clear contact paper (optional)

Print labels onto the full-sheet adhesive paper. Make sure you are printing them at 100% — your PDF software may try to automatically resize them. Trim away white edges (a paper cutter really comes in handy for this part). Remove backing, center over a filled jar, and press firmly in the middle of the label. Then smooth both edges around the back.

If desired, cover the labels with clear contact paper before you cut them out to protect the label from running if exposed to steam or moisture. But really, who are you kidding. This won’t last long enough in someone’s kitchen to have the label run, because vanilla sugar goes on everything.

Twelve days of food gifts: orange sugar

twelve days of food gifts 2012: apple cider caramels | basil vodka | lemon sugar | lime sugar | Old Bay vodka | orange sugar | peppercorn vodka | rosemary salt | salted maple caramels | vanilla extract | vanilla sugar | zesty salt’n'pep

Another infused sugar! I know. But they’re nice and easy so I made a few. There’s only one more. I swear.

For those of you just joining us, this is my Twelve Days of Food Gifts series. I’m making some edibles, packin’ em up, slappin’ some labels on there and putting them under the tree. And… posting everything here for you so you can do the same.

The orange sugar ended up being my favorite, which I didn’t expect. It infused the fastest, got the least clumpy and annoying, and the flavor is delicate but very distinctly orange.

What would I use orange infused sugar for? Sprinkling on top of cookies or muffins before baking (either chocolate or vanilla would be divine), and sweetening oatmeal.

orange sugarOrange Sugar

Makes 4 jars

heaping 1 2/3 cup sugar
1 orange (organic recommended)

Scrub your orange very well.

Using a vegetable peeler, peel the skin off of the orange in strips. Put in glass jar. Cover with sugar. Shake shake shake.

Let sit in a cool, dark spot for 5 to 7 days, until fragrant. Shake at least twice a day.

Pour sugar onto a baking sheet, spread out, break up clumps with a spoon, and let dry. Once dry, sift sugar to remove orange peels and break up any lasting clumps. Then, pack scented sugar into spice jars.

For Gifting:
J.K. Adams 2 ounce Flint Jars
full-sheet inkjet adhesive
printable (single 5.25″x2.75″ label)
printable (3 5.25″x2.75″ labels per 8.5″x11″ adhesive sheet)
clear contact paper (optional)

Print labels onto the full-sheet adhesive paper. Make sure you are printing them at 100% — your PDF software may try to automatically resize them. Trim away white edges (a paper cutter really comes in handy for this part). Remove backing, center over a filled jar, and press firmly in the middle of the label. Then smooth both edges around the back.

If desired, cover the labels with clear contact paper before you cut them out to protect the label from running. You’re a better person than I.

Twelve days of food gifts: lime sugar

twelve days of food gifts 2012: apple cider caramels | basil vodka | lemon sugar | lime sugar | Old Bay vodka | orange sugar | peppercorn vodka | rosemary salt | salted maple caramels | vanilla extract | vanilla sugar | zesty salt’n'pep

Somehow, I have managed to not fall behind on this… so here’s another installment of my Twelve Days of Food Gifts series. I post recipes, links to packaging materials, and printable labels so that you too can give your friends and family awesome goodies.

Today… well, I told you it wouldn’t be the end of the infused sugars, right?

This lime sugar takes a little longer to infuse than the lemon sugar. Perhaps I should have posted this one first, huh? But besides that, it’s very similar in that it’s low-maintenance — just let it sit and do its thing.

So what would I use lime infused sugar for? Making mojitos, rimming margarita glasses, giving a kick to lemonade, and sprinkling on fresh fruit.

lime sugarLime Sugar

Makes 4 jars

heaping 1 2/3 cup sugar
2 limes (organic recommended)
additional lime (optional)

Scrub your limes very well.

Using a vegetable peeler, peel the skin off of the limes in strips. Put in glass jar. Cover with sugar. Shake shake shake.

Let sit in a cool, dark spot for about 1 1/2 to 2 weeks, until very fragrant. Shake at least twice a day.

Dump sugar onto a baking sheet, and break up clumps. Let sit for several hours to let dry. To speed up the process, put in the oven on the lowest setting, and let bake with the door propped open, stirring frequently. Bake for 15 minutes, let cool, and then repeat as necessary. Sift sugar to remove lime peels and break up clumps.

If more flavor is desired, zest in a small amount of lime peel to leave in (rather than sifting out), and let dry. Once completely dry, pack scented sugar into spice jars.

For Gifting:
J.K. Adams 2 ounce Flint Jars
full-sheet inkjet adhesive
printable (single 5.25″x2.75″ label)
printable (3 5.25″x2.75″ labels per 8.5″x11″ adhesive sheet)
clear contact paper (optional)

Print labels onto the full-sheet adhesive paper. Make sure you are printing them at 100% — your PDF software may try to automatically resize them. Trim away white edges (a paper cutter really comes in handy for this part). Remove backing, center over a filled jar, and press firmly in the middle of the label. Then smooth both edges around the back.

If desired, cover the labels with clear contact paper before you cut them out to protect the label from running.

Twelve days of food gifts: rosemary salt

twelve days of food gifts 2012: apple cider caramels | basil vodka | lemon sugar | lime sugar | Old Bay vodka | orange sugar | peppercorn vodka | rosemary salt | salted maple caramels | vanilla extract | vanilla sugar | zesty salt’n'pep

So far we have a least two days of food gifts, as this is my second post in my twelve days of food gifts series for the winter holidays.

Basically, I post recipes, links to specialty supplies, and printable labels so you too can give awesome homemade comestibles to your friends and family.

On the savory end of the spectrum, today I’m making rosemary salt.

rosemary saltThis rosemary was, as is my habit, pinched from my friend’s yard. I’ll actually be sending a jar of this to the person who originally planted the bush. Full circle.

rosemary saltRosemary Salt

Makes 4 jars

1 2/3 cup fine sea salt
4 large (1′ long) fresh rosemary sprigs

Wash rosemary sprigs and pat dry. Make sure they’re fully dry before continuing.

Cut 3 springs of rosemary into thirds and crush the leaves gently with your fingers. Place in a medium pot. Cover with salt.

Heat over very low, stirring frequently, until whoever you live with walks into the room and says “why does the entire house smell like rosemary?” and rosemary is shriveled — about 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool completely.

Take the last fresh rosemary sprig and cut into thirds, then place in a clean glass jar. Pour cooled salt/rosemary mixture into jar. Shake well and seal tightly. Leave for 3 to 5 days, shaking at least twice a day.

Wash and dry your jars and lids at some point so they’re ready to pack.

When fully infused, sift salt and remove rosemary. Then pack into jars.

For Gifting:
J.K. Adams 2 ounce Flint Jars
full-sheet inkjet adhesive
printable (single label)
printable (3 labels per 8.5″x11″ adhesive sheet)
clear contact paper (optional)

Print labels onto the full-sheet adhesive paper. Make sure you are printing them at 100% — your PDF software may try to automatically resize them. Trim away white edges (a paper cutter really comes in handy for this part). Remove backing, center over a filled jar, and press firmly in the middle of the label. Then smooth both edges around the back.

To protect the label from running if it is exposed to liquid, cover with clear contact paper before cutting out the labels. I was too lazy to do this, but maybe you aren’t!

Twelve days of food gifts: lemon sugar

twelve days of food gifts 2012: apple cider caramels | basil vodka | lemon sugar | lime sugar | Old Bay vodka | orange sugar | peppercorn vodka | rosemary salt | salted maple caramels | vanilla extract | vanilla sugar | zesty salt’n'pep

Have you always wanted to give homemade gifts for Christmas, but not sure where to start or how to get it all done?

This year, as part of my twelve days of food gifts series, I’m showing you what all of my friends and family are getting under their trees this year. Not only that, but I’m going to try to help you duplicate it, quick and easy! I’ll provide the recipe, links to where I bought any specialty packaging supplies, and printable labels to slap on your delicious vittles and libations before sending them out the door.

So, we’ll see if I actually finish all of these. I can be a little too ambitious sometimes. Maybe it’ll be like, seven days of food gifts. We’ll see.

We’re starting with lemon sugar!

Scented sugars are really easy to make for gifts, as they require very little active work. You need some time to let the sugar infuse, but you don’t really have to do much besides shake the jar a few times a day. This is not the last infused sugar you’ll be seeing in this series, is what I’m saying.

So, what would I use lemon infused sugar for? Rimming cocktail glasses, sweetening tea or lemonade, and sprinkling on top of cookies.

lemon sugarLemon Sugar

Makes 4 jars

heaping 1 2/3 cup sugar
1 lemon (organic recommended)

Scrub your lemon very well.

Using a vegetable peeler, peel the skin off of the lemon in strips. Put in glass jar. Cover with sugar. Shake shake shake.

Let sit in a cool, dark spot for at least one week, until very fragrant. Shake at least twice a day. You will notice some of the sugar sticking to the bottom of the jar from the oils — that’s okay, just shake the best you can.

Wash and dry your jars and lids at some point, so they are good to go when you’re ready to pack.

Remove sugar mixture from jar and spread in a baking pan and let sit, uncovered, to dry out for several hours. To speed up the process, put in the oven on the lowest setting, and let bake with the door propped open, stirring frequently. Bake for 15 minutes, let cool, and then repeat as necessary (if you bake for too long you may accidentally melt the sugar). Sift sugar to remove lemon peel and break up clumps.

Pack scented sugar into spice jars.

For Gifting:
J.K. Adams 2 ounce Flint Jars
full-sheet inkjet adhesive
printable (single label)
printable (3 labels per 8.5″x11″ adhesive sheet)
clear contact paper (optional)

Print labels onto the full-sheet adhesive paper. Make sure you are printing them at 100% — your PDF software may try to automatically resize them. Trim away white edges (a paper cutter really comes in handy for this part). Remove backing, center over a filled jar, and press firmly in the middle of the label. Then smooth both edges around the back.

If you want to go the extra mile, cover the labels with clear contact paper before you cut them out. This will protect the label from running if it is exposed to steam or liquid.

I, uh, did not go the extra mile.